A 10 month old giant rabbit flew United Airlines from London to Chicago last month and died, becoming the latest in a series of controversies the beleaguered US airline is having to contend with.

The rabbit, offspring of the world's current largest rabbit, was expected to claim the title for itself by growing from 90 centimetres (3 ft) to 1.3 metres.

The rabbit was alive and well when the aircraft flew, according to breeder and former Playboy model Annette Edwards, but met its fate before the plane landed.

After days of tense negotiations, United spokesperson Charles Hobart confirmed the airline had reached a settlement with Edwards. But the Guardian reports that the rabbits owners are also demanding compensation for a loss of future earnings--the rabbit was due to appear the Iowa State Fair in the US.

The incident comes less than a month after the airline was at the centre of what is thought to be aviation's biggest PR disaster when a doctor on an overbooked flight was violently wrested from his seat and dragged while incapacitated across the aisles.

Footage of the incident went viral on social media and caused its stock value to plummet by over a billion dollars, forcing once adamant CEO Oscar Munoz to apologise multiple times for the airline's role in the incident.

The airline later reached a settlement with the doctor out of court.

A 10 month old giant rabbit flew United Airlines from London to Chicago last month and died, becoming the latest in a series of controversies the beleaguered US airline is having to contend with.

The rabbit, offspring of the world's current largest rabbit, was expected to claim the title for itself by growing from 90 centimetres (3 ft) to 1.3 metres.

The rabbit was alive and well when the aircraft flew, according to breeder and former Playboy model Annette Edwards, but met its fate before the plane landed.

After days of tense negotiations, United spokesperson Charles Hobart confirmed the airline had reached a settlement with Edwards. But the Guardian reports that the rabbits owners are also demanding compensation for a loss of future earnings--the rabbit was due to appear the Iowa State Fair in the US.

The incident comes less than a month after the airline was at the centre of what is thought to be aviation's biggest PR disaster when a doctor on an overbooked flight was violently wrested from his seat and dragged while incapacitated across the aisles.

Footage of the incident went viral on social media and caused its stock value to plummet by over a billion dollars, forcing once adamant CEO Oscar Munoz to apologise multiple times for the airline's role in the incident.

The airline later reached a settlement with the doctor out of court.

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