Denmark's Ramboll to target Asia, GCC façade project wins in 2019

Denmark's Ramboll to target Asia, GCC façade project wins in 2019
Ramboll is working on Manama's Vida Hotel in Marassi Al Bahrain.
Published: 4 March 2019 - 7 a.m.
By: Oscar Rousseau

After picking up projects in Bahrain and the UAE last year, Ramboll’s head of façade, Benjamin Beer, told Construction Week that the Danish construction consultancy plans to tap into Asia and the GCC for added growth in 2019.

“This will work partly through direct project wins of the façade team, but also [from other] group projects, considering that Ramboll is a large organisation with more than 15,000 employees,” he continued.

Ramboll’s façade team is already working on a mix of pre-contract design and post-contract schemes, as well as site supervision, quality assurance, and quality control service projects.

The company's project portfolio includes the 49-storey Golden Tower in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; and in the UAE, Fly Dubai’s new corporate headquarters, and Dubai Hills Business Park.

We have been very successful in securing various large, mid-size, and even small façade projects over the last year.

Imkan’s Makers District and the C105 Waterfront in Abu Dhabi; The Address and Vida Hotel in Marassi Al Bahrain; and Phase 1 of Royal Pearls, and Burj Royale in the UAE are among Ramboll’s pre-contract projects secured for 2019.

The company is also providing façade services for the Hindu Temple project in Abu Dhabi, and Beer said that Ramboll’s major façade-related project wins from last year have set the tone for growth in 2019.

“We have been very successful in securing various large, mid-size, and even small façade projects over the last year,” he said.

Looking ahead, Beer said there are two façade engineering trends the market should keep an eye on in 2019 and beyond.

“On the one side, the typical projects are seeing tremendous pressure for value engineering, and on the other hand the high-profile projects with architectural design intents are pushing for more curved and complex geometry façades,” he noted.

“This requires new approaches by the design team, as traditionally the role of the façade engineer started after the building geometries were defined by the architect," Beer explained.

"Nowadays, the complex geometric façades of contemporary architecture require close collaboration with the façade engineer to assess technical feasibility, even during the early geometry study and modulation design stage.”

Click here to add your comment

Please add your comment below
Name
Country
Email
Your email address will not be published
Captcha