Experts call for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) to help reach the Paris Agreement

Experts call for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) to help reach the Paris Agreement
Published: 18 June 2019 - 8:32 a.m.
By: Baset Asaba

Experts are meeting to share their thoughts, exchange ideas, and work to advance how CCS can help reach the Paris Agreement. Attendees will work to develop options for lowering greenhouse gas emissions, while also addressing the financial, political and social barriers that limit the widespread adoption of carbon capture technologies. The conference is supported by the Norwegian CCS Center Research, Research Council of Norway, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and SINTEF.

“Europe needs to reach deep into their wallets to make the Paris Agreement work. Research on climate technology is key to a low carbon Europe,” says Nils Røkke, Chairman of the Board of the European Energy Research Alliance and Executive Vice President of Sustainability for SINTEF, one of Europe’s largest independent research organisations.

For the next two days the conference will host leading CCS experts including Tim Dixon, General Manager, IEAGHG; Mona J. Mølnvik, Research Director, SINTEF Energy Research; Katherine D. Romanak, Research Scientist, University of Texas at Austin; Trude Sundset, CEO, Gassnova; James Dawson, Professor, NTNU; Stephen Bull, Senior Vice President, Equinor among others.

“Well below 2 degrees”, was the global goal set during the Paris Agreement. Executing this feat involves an extensive transformation of our energy sector, requiring a collective approach from all parties. CCS plays an important role in this transformation and can provide a unique solution to many of our climate challenges. One such solution is being able to significantly reduce emissions from coal, gas-fired power plants and industrial processes, which remain an integral part of most modern societies. TCCS-10 calls for more investments in research and support in the widespread implementation of CCS technologies to bridge the gap between our climate ambitions and actions.

SINTEF and NTNU have worked with CCS technology with Norwegian and international industrial actors and researchers for several decades. In Trondheim, pan-European collaboration through the ECCSEL laboratory is making important contributions to CCS development. Norway has also initiated the world’s first full-scale, industrial CCS system at a cement plant and a waste incinerator plant. This makes Trondheim the perfect city to host the TCCS-10 conference.

150 presentations and 100 scientific posters are expected at the conference. The SINTEF and NTNU CCS award for outstanding CCS achievements will be presented for the 5th time at TCCS-10.

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